Skip Navigation

NCFS

Newsdesk - 2019

October 7, 2019

Ahead of expected busy fall wildfire season, fire officials urge caution and offer tips for prevention

Oct. 6-12 is National Fire Prevention Week


RALEIGH, NC- As we enter the start of the fall wildfire season, the N.C. Forest Service and the USDA Forest Service urge visitors and North Carolinians to be cautious with campfires and when burning yard debris. This reminder coincides with National Fire Prevention Week, which runs Oct. 6-12.

The fall wildfire season typically lasts from mid-October until mid-December, the time of year when people do a lot of yard work that may include burning leaves and yard debris. The leading cause of wildfires in North Carolina is debris burning. When left unattended, debris fires can escape and start wildfires.

“We will not forget the 2016 fall wildfire season that burned more than 59,511 acres across North Carolina,” said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. “As we head into this fall fire season facing similarly dry weather conditions, let’s remember that each of us can do our part to avoid to prevent wildfires. It is important to exercise extreme caution while burning debris of any kind.”

There are many factors to consider before burning debris. The N.C. Forest Service encourages residents to contact their local county forest ranger before burning debris. The ranger can offer technical advice and explain the best options to help ensure the safety of people, property and the forest. To find contact information for your local county ranger, visit our contact page

For people who choose to burn debris, the N.C. Forest Service offers the following tips to protect property and prevent wildfires:

  • Consider alternatives to burning. Some types of debris, such as leaves, grass and stubble, may be of more value if they are not burned, but used for mulch instead.
  • Check local burning laws. Some communities allow burning only during specified hours. Others forbid it entirely.
  • Make sure you have a valid permit. You can obtain a burn permit at any N.C. Forest Service office or authorized permitting agent, or online.
  • Keep an eye on the weather. Don’t burn on dry, windy days.
  • Local fire officials can recommend a safe way to burn debris. Don’t pile vegetation on the ground. Instead, place it in a cleared area and contain it in a screened receptacle away from overhead branches and wires.
  • Household trash should be hauled away to a trash or recycling station. It is illegal to burn anything other than yard debris.
  • Be sure you are fully prepared before burning. To control the fire, you will need a hose, bucket, steel rake and a shovel for tossing dirt on the fire. Keep a phone nearby, too.
  • Never use kerosene, gasoline, diesel fuel or other flammable liquids to speed up debris burning.
  • Stay with your fire until it is completely out.
  • Burning agricultural residue and forestland litter: In addition to the rules above, a fire line should be plowed around the area to be burned. Large fields should be separated into small plots for burning one at a time. Before doing any burning in a wooded area, contact your county ranger, who will weigh all factors, explain them and offer technical advice.

The USDA Forest Service also reminds campers to be cautious when burning campfires. Use existing fire rings if possible and clear a safe area around them of at least 15 feet. Never leave campfires unattended, and ensure they are completely out before leaving.

The U.S. Forest Service offers the following guidelines for safely extinguishing campfires and helping to prevent wildfires:

  • Allow the wood to burn completely to ash, if possible.
  • Pour lots of water on the fire, drown ALL embers, not just the red ones.
  • Pour until the hissing sound stops.
  • Stir campfire ashes and embers with a shovel.
  • Scrape the sticks and logs to remove any embers.
  • Stir and make sure everything is wet and that embers are cold to the touch.
  • If you do not have water, use dirt. Pour dirt or sand on the fire, mixing enough dirt or sand with the embers to extinguish the fire.
  • Continue adding or stirring until all remaining material is cool.
  • Do NOT bury the fire as the fire will continue to smolder and could catch roots on fire that will eventually get to the surface and start a wildfire.

Always exercise caution with any outdoor burning. Even when burn bans are not in effect, weather conditions may not be favorable for outdoor fires. Outdoor burning is discouraged during periods of low humidity or high winds.

Studies have shown that taking these and other measures can reduce the possibility of wildfires. To learn more about fire safety and preventing wildfires and loss of property, visit our website and Smokey Bear's website.

# # #

September 26, 2019

JOINT NEWS RELEASE

North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services

North Carolina Forest Service

North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission

United States Department of Agriculture

Photo of agreement signing ceremony

New agreement between federal, state agencies highlights cooperative approach to land management


ASHEVILLE, NC- September 26, 2019 - The United States Department of Agriculture's Under Secretary for Natural Resources and the Environment signed a Shared Stewardship agreement between USDA's Forest Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service and the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, the North Carolina Forest Service, and the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission in a ceremony here yesterday.

USDA Under Secretary Jim Hubbard signed the agreement with Steve Troxler, Commissioner of NCDA&CS; Scott Bissette, Assistant Commissioner of NCFS; and Gordan Myers, Executive Director of NCWRC.

"Shared Stewardship offers a great opportunity to coordinate and prioritize land management activities in tandem," said Hubbard. "The USDA and its agencies have a long and strong history of collaboration with the State of North Carolina. This agreement will make that working relationship even stronger."

The Shared Stewardship Agreement establishes a framework for federal and state agencies to collaborate better, focus on accomplishing mutual goals, further common interests, and effectively respond to the increasing ecological challenges and natural resource concerns in North Carolina.

"Partnerships remain essential to everything we do as an agency and allows for greater success in reaching our conservation goals and in protecting our natural resources," Troxler said. "The Shared Stewardship agreement strengthens our commitment to partnership in these areas of mutual benefit."

In addition to providing a framework for how the federal and state agencies will work together, the Shared Stewardship agreement also outlines the importance of ensuring meaningful participation from state and local partners such as North Carolina's State Parks, Natural Heritage Program, Department of Transportation, Conservation Districts, and non-governmental conservation organizations.

# # #

September 6, 2019

Remember safety first during storm debris cleanup


RALEIGH - Hurricane Dorian has resulted in damaged and downed trees and branches. The North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services is encouraging homeowners and anyone else looking to clean up after a storm to exercise caution and think safety first. Unless a damaged tree is a safety risk, potential tree removal decisions can come later after the initial storm cleanup. After a storm, hasty or emotional decisions about damaged trees can result in unnecessary removals or drastic pruning decisions. The following are some basic guidelines:

Debris cleanup

  • Cleaning up downed debris presents safety risks including poor footing and potentially downed electric lines. If electrical wires are an issue, do not attempt tree work. Contact your utility company and let them remove the electrical wires.
  • If you use a chainsaw, do so in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Work only on the ground and always wear personal protective equipment such as a hard hat and hearing and eye protection. Be cautious of cutting any branches under tension or pressure.
  • Wear appropriate clothing – hard sole shoes, gloves, jeans or overalls, eye protection
  • Look up, down and all around before you start the work
  • Size up lifting heavy objects to determine if you need help or can do alone
  • Lift with your legs, not your back
  • Utilize a proper disposal site for building debris
  • Burning building debris is illegal in NC – the only items allowed are woody debris like logs, branches, twigs and leaves.
  • Do not work on debris removal in standing water, as unknown hazards may be underneath the water’s surface. Wait for the area to dry out before cleaning up.
  • Promptly treat any cuts or scrapes with first aid to avoid infection. If metal pierces the skin, consider the need for a tetanus shot at minimum. If exposed to raw water, also consider Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B shots.

Perform a general safety inspection of your trees

  • Is the soil around the base of the tree lifting or cracking? This may be an indication the tree may be falling over. Standing water, which often accompanies hurricanes, can cause additional stress and mortality.
  • Look up into the canopy of the tree. Are there any cracked, split or broken hanging branches?
  • These types of problems should be inspected and addressed by a consulting or qualified arborist.

Resources

  • Choose a qualified and insured tree service or consulting arborist. To find qualified arborists in your area, visit The International Society of Arboriculture at www.treesaregood.com, the American Society of Consulting Arborists at www.asca-consultants.org, or the Tree Care Industry Association at www.treecareindustry.org.
  • Helpful resources for tree care, before and after a storm including caring for storm-damaged trees, deciding whether to remove, repair or replace, planning your response, plus a post-storm assessment guide for evaluating trees is available from the N.C. Forest Service Urban and Community Forestry Program webpage or by calling 919-857-4842.
  • More information and advice on proper tree care and tree assessment following a storm at this website by following the links to storm recovery under forest health.
  • Numerous resources for storm-damaged woodlands (including helpful contacts, damage assessment aids, damage impacts on trees, salvage logging, legal and regulatory guidance, safety considerations and tax implications) can also be found at https://www.ncforestservice.gov/Managing_your_forest/damage_recovery.htm

# # #

 

July 25, 2019

ForestHer NC offers workshops for women in woodland stewardship


RALEIGH - The N.C. Forest Service is partnering on ForestHer NC, a new initiative created by conservation organizations in North Carolina, to provide women who are forest landowners with tools and training to help them manage their lands and become more engaged in forest stewardship.

While 65 percent of private forestland In North Carolina is jointly owned by women, statistics indicate that women are significantly less likely to attend conventional landowner programs and participate in management activities. ForestHer NC aims to reverse this trend by offering programing tailored to women.

"Our goal is to create an opportunity for women to come together and learn not only from the offered programming, but also from each other," said Jennifer Roach, district 11 forester with the N.C. Forest Service.

Women landowners and natural resource professionals interested in learning more are invited to attend one of three ForestHer NC workshops which will be held across the state in August. During the workshops, participants will learn about North Carolina’s forest ecosystems, identify the types of forests they own and/or manage, and understand the role their woodland plays in the greater landscape. Other topics include defining and balancing multiple land management objectives, obtaining a forest management plan, reading aerial photographs and topo maps and identifying resources available locally to help with land management. These three events in August are the first in a series of quarterly workshops offered regionally.

"More women are making the primary decisions about their family farm and forest lands. Partnerships like ForestHer NC are an excellent way to engage these women landowners," said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler.

ForestHer NC is sponsored by conservation organizations including the N.C. Forest Service, U.S Forest Service, N.C. Tree Farm Program, N.C. Wildlife Resource Commission, Audubon North Carolina, Wild Turkey Federation, N.C. State Extension, and the Sustainable Forestry and Land Retention Project. The August workshops will run from 9:30 a.m. until 3 p.m. and cost $25 per person. Pre-registration is required.

  • August 8, 2019
    Chatham County Center
    1192 US 64 W Business
    Pittsboro, NC
    Registration Link
  • August 22, 2019
    Lenoir County Center
    1791 Hwy 11/55
    Kinston, NC
    Registration Link
  • August 29, 2019
    Burke County Center
    130 Ammons Drive
    Morganton, NC
    Registration Link

# # #

 

July 24, 2019

Linville River restoration project community meeting to be held August 8


CROSSNORE - The N.C. Forest Service will host a community meeting Thursday, Aug. 8 at 7 p.m. at the Crossnore Mountain Training Facility at 6065 Linville Falls Highway, Newland, NC. The meeting will last up to one hour and include a presentation on the Linville River Restoration Project occurring on Gill State Forest starting in August. Attendees will also have an opportunity to ask questions about the restoration work.

This habitat improvement project will restore about 2,500 linear feet of river channel and enhance 500 feet of an unnamed tributary that flows into the river. All planned restoration work is on state-owned property managed by the Forest Service.

"This meeting is the first step in communicating the restoration efforts planned for the water resources at Gill State Forest, and the long-term benefits including improved aquatic habitat and an enhanced trout fishery," said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler.

As construction begins, the Forest Service plans to have a representative onsite to answer questions about the restoration project. Once construction commences, updates about the project will be posted on a temporary kiosk in the visitors access parking lot near the restoration site, on N.C. Forest Service social media and online. The river reach being restored will be closed to recreationists during construction for public and worker safety. The Mountain Training Facility and Linville River Nursery will remain open for business during the construction work.

Some of the restoration project partners include the Resource Institute, N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, U.S.D.A. Forest Service and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

# # #

 

July 23, 2019

Duke Energy and Harris Lake County Park honored for longleaf pine restoration efforts


NEW HILL – The N.C. Forest Service joined others from the N.C. Longleaf Coalition to jointly recognize Duke Energy and Harris Lake County Park as part of the N.C. Longleaf Honor Roll. This prestigious award was presented for their efforts to manage longleaf pine with prescribed fire on 60-acres within the 684-acre public park, owned by Duke Energy and leased to Wake County Parks and Recreation. This recognition coincides with the park celebrating its 20th year.

The N.C. Longleaf Honor Roll was created by the N.C. Longleaf Coalition to recognize landowners who are working toward longleaf restoration while balancing all the values of the forest – producing wood products and wildlife habitat, and offering recreational opportunities. To be eligible for the Longleaf Honor Roll, Harris Lake County Park staff demonstrated active forest management, including following the recommendations in its forest management plan written by Derek Ware, forester with Duke Energy. Most notable are prescribed fire efforts, having conducted prescribed burns every two to three years since the longleaf pine was planted. A native plant restoration effort, supported by Duke Energy, is also underway on-site.

Once the dominant pine species in the eastern half of North Carolina, longleaf pine experienced a drastic decline across the Southeastern U.S. until restoration efforts, like that at Harris Lake County Park, began reversing the trend. "It was the forethought of the Wake County Park planners and director many years ago that recognized a few mature longleaf pines on the property as an important resource and sought to expand them by developing the longleaf pine restoration area as part of the park," said Christina Sorenson Hester, park manager for Harris Lake County Park and the American Tobacco Trail.

In addition to the longleaf management, Harris Lake County Park is an educational ambassador for longleaf in Wake County. Each year, over 150,000 visitors have the opportunity to hike to the longleaf pine stand or take part in an array of educational programs, the most notable being the annual Longleaf Festival. The festival, in its 10th year, recognizes the significance of longleaf pine ecosystems and the historical contribution of these forests to the Tar Heel state.

Duke Energy and Harris Lake County were nominated for the Longleaf Honor Roll by N.C. Forest Service personnel: District 11 Forester Jennifer Roach, Wake County Ranger Chris Frey, and Forest Fire Equipment Operator Jeff Ulrick. The N.C. Forest Service has collaborated with the Harris Lake longleaf restoration project since its early stages, providing prescribed fire assistance, forest management recommendations, and participating in the Longleaf Festival. "Prescribed fire is important for the forest and reduces risk of wildfire. When I started with the North Carolina Forest Service, my first fire was at Harris Lake and I have been involved in every prescribed burn here since. This group has worked hard to make it happen year after year," Ulrick said.

To learn more about the N.C. Longleaf Coalition, visit: www.nclongleaf.org. If you’re interested in managing your forestland, contact your county ranger.

# # #

 

June 27, 2019

Use extreme caution with fireworks during dry conditions

Fireworks caused 35 wildfires in 2018


RALEIGH– Elevated wildfire risks due to abnormally dry conditions in Eastern North Carolina are prompting N.C. Forest Service officials to urge extreme caution with fireworks and to celebrate safely this Independence Day. Forecast chances for rain are slight at best and are unlikely in the southeastern counties for the next several days where warm temperatures will continue to raise the risk of wildfires.

"There were 35 wildfires sparked by fireworks in North Carolina in 2018 despite it being a very wet year," said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. "To reduce the risk of starting wildfires from fireworks during the upcoming holiday, we recommend enjoying professional fireworks shows rather than setting off personal fireworks if possible."

Even small fireworks such as sparklers, fountains, glow worms, smoke devices, trick noisemakers and other Class C fireworks can be hazardous. For example, sparklers burn at temperatures above 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit. Glow worms burn directly on the ground near ignition sources. Wildfires caused by fireworks can be prosecuted under the forest protection laws of North Carolina and individuals may be subject to reimbursing the costs for fire suppression.

    If you choose to display your own fireworks, here are some safety tips to follow:
  • Don't use fireworks such as ground spinners, firecrackers, round spinners, Roman candles, bottle rockets and mortars, which are illegal in North Carolina.
  • Do not use fireworks near dry vegetation or any combustible material.
  • Don't aim fireworks at trees, bushes or hedges where dry leaves may ignite.
  • Make sure fireworks are always used with adult supervision.
  • Follow instructions provided with fireworks.
  • Do not use fireworks while under the influence of alcohol.
  • Have a rake or shovel and a water source nearby.
  • Ensure all burning material is completely extinguished afterwards and monitor the area for several hours.

"As the population in North Carolina continues to increase and more homes are built in wooded areas, it’s important for everyone to understand wildfire prevention," said State Forester David Lane. "In addition to using fireworks safely, campfires or grills should never be left unattended."

Campfire and grill ashes should be doused with water and stirred. Repeat this process to ensure ashes are cold. Place ashes in outside metal containers or bury them in mineral soil. Never put ashes in a paper bag, plastic bucket or other flammable container. Never store ashes in a garage, on a deck or in a wooded area. Double-check that ashes and coals are completely cold by feeling with the back of a bare hand before throwing them away to make sure a fire won’t start.

For more information, contact your local N.C. Forest Service office or visit the NCFS website

# # #

 

June 10, 2019

Burn ban lifted for 18 eastern North Carolina counties as conditions improve

RALEIGH – The burn ban for Beaufort, Bladen, Brunswick, Carteret, Columbus, Craven, Dare, Duplin, Hyde, Jones, Lenoir, New Hanover, Onslow, Pamlico, Pender, Pitt, Tyrrell and Washington counties has been lifted as of 5 p.m. Monday, June 10. The ban went into effect on May 30 due to extremely dry conditions in the area.

Burn permits are now available in those counties once again, however caution is strongly encouraged with any open burning as careless debris burns are the leading cause of wildfires in North Carolina.

"We’re thankful for the recent rainfall and improved conditions which have lessened much of the wildfire risk in the Coastal area," said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. "Even with the burn ban in place, wildland firefighters with our N.C. Forest Service responded to 53 wildfires covering 342 acres within those burn ban counties. The ban’s purpose was to prevent human-caused fires, freeing up responders to focus on wildfires naturally caused by lightning."

The online burn permit system is open again statewide. All burn permits previously granted within the 18 burn ban counties were cancelled when the ban was implemented so new permit applications must be submitted. Online burn permits are available at www.ncforestservice.gov or in-person from local agent within each county.

Residents with questions regarding their specific county can contact their county ranger with the N.C. Forest Service or their county fire marshal’s office.

# # #



June 3, 2019

Don’t fly drones near wildfires

Unmanned aerial systems can endanger wildland firefighting operations


RALEIGH- An increased use of drones, or unmanned aerial systems, around active wildfires are putting wildland firefighting operations at risk. These devices fly within the same altitude as aerial firefighting aircraft, which is between ground level and 200 feet. Firefighting aircraft do not have any methods of detecting drones other than by seeing them. Visually detecting drones is nearly impossible due to their small size.

"To put it simply, drones and firefighting aircraft don't mix," said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. "If you fly, the firefighters can’t. Aerial collisions between drones and aircraft could occur. Due to these safety concerns, when drones are spotted near wildfires, aircraft must land or move away to other areas. This means no fire retardant or water can be dropped, no tactical information can be provided to firefighters from above, and homes or other property could be put at risk if wildfires grow larger."

The N.C. Forest Service is requesting the public’s help to keep wildland and aerial firefighters safe by not flying drones anywhere near a wildfire. N.C. General Statue 14-208.3 states that drone operators may not damage, disrupt the operation of or otherwise interfere with manned flights. Anyone in violation of this law can be found guilty of a Class H felony.

For more information, contact your local N.C. Forest Service office or visit the NCFS website.



# # #

May 30, 2019

Burn ban issued for 18 eastern North Carolina counties due to hazardous forest fire conditions


RALEIGH – Due to increased fire risk, the N.C. Forest Service has issued a ban on all open burning and canceled all burning permits for the following counties in Eastern North Carolina (map view): Beaufort, Bladen, Brunswick, Carteret, Columbus, Craven, Dare, Duplin, Hyde, Jones, Lenoir, New Hanover, Onslow, Pamlico, Pender, Pitt, Tyrrell and Washington.

The burning ban goes into effect at 5 p.m. on Thursday, May 30, 2019, and will remain in effect until further notice. The N.C. Forest Service will continue to monitor conditions.

Under North Carolina law, the ban prohibits all open burning in the affected counties, regardless of whether a permit was issued. The issuance of any new permits has also been suspended until the ban is lifted. Violating the burn ban incurs a $100 fine plus $180 court costs. The person responsible for setting a fire may be liable for reimbursing the N.C. Forest Service for any expenses related to extinguishing it.

"The dry weather conditions these last few weeks, plus the potential for an increase in human-caused wildfires in the region, makes this ban on open burning necessary," said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. "During the month of May, there have been 355 wildfires statewide, covering 1,348 acres. This burn ban is a proactive step to protect lives and property by preventing human-caused wildfires."

Local fire departments and law enforcement officers are assisting the N.C. Forest Service in enforcing the burn ban.

Answers to frequently asked questions

Q: What is open burning?
A: Open burning includes burning leaves, branches or other plant material. In all cases, burning trash, lumber, tires, newspapers, plastics or other non-vegetative material is illegal.

Q: May I still use my grill or barbeque?
A: Yes, if no other local ordinances prohibit their use.

Q: How should I report a wildfire?
A: Call 911 to report a wildfire.

Q: My local fire marshal has also issued a burn ban for my county. What does this mean?
A: The burn ban issued by the N.C. Forest service does not apply to a fire within 100 feet of an occupied dwelling. Local government agencies have jurisdiction over open burning within 100 feet of an occupied dwelling. The N.C. Forest Service has advised county fire marshals of the burning ban and asked for their consideration of also implementing a burning ban. If a fire within a 100-foot area of a dwelling escapes containment, a North Carolina forest ranger may take reasonable steps to extinguish or control it. The person responsible for setting the fire may be liable for reimbursing the N.C. Forest Service for any expenses related to extinguishing it.

Q: Are there other instances which impact open burning?
A: Local ordinances and air quality regulations may impact open burning. For instance, outdoor burning is prohibited in areas covered by Code Orange or Code Red air quality forecasts. Learn more about air quality forecasts on the Air Quality Website

Q: Can I have a campfire when I go camping?
A: Campfires would be considered open burning and are not exempt from the burn ban. Portable gas stoves or grills are alternate methods for cooking food while camping during a burn ban.

Q: What can I do to protect my house against the risk of wildfire?
A: Learn about wildfire risk assessments and preparedness and prevention plans on the N.C. Forest Service website

Residents with questions regarding their specific county can contact their county ranger with the N.C. Forest Service or their county fire marshal’s office.

# # #


May 29, 2019

N.C. Forest Service urges extreme caution with fire

Careless debris burning is the leading cause of wildfires in North Carolina


RALEIGH - The N.C. Forest Service urges everyone to be cautious with fire. The lack of rainfall in most areas has increased the probability of wildfires, especially within the eastern portion of the state. The U.S. Drought Monitor lists 21 counties in southeast North Carolina as abnormally dry.

"There are several things to consider before burning debris or lighting a campfire," cautions Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. "Some tips to remember are to always check the weather prior to burning. Follow all state and local regulations. Ensure any fires are an adequate safe distance from other flammable material, especially wooded areas and flammable material that may lead to houses. With all fires, maintain a constant watch until the debris pile or campfire is completely out."

Careless debris burning is the leading cause of wildfires in North Carolina. Landowners with electric fences should also be aware that dry, high grass is susceptible to catching fire from even the smallest of sparks. A grass fire can quickly consume a barn or home and spread to wooded areas.

    The N.C. Forest Service urges people to follow these tips to protect property and prevent wildfires:
  • Consider alternatives to burning. Some types of debris, such as leaves, grass and stubble, may be of more value if they are not burned, but used for mulch instead.
  • Check local burning laws. Some communities allow burning only during specified hours. Others forbid it entirely.
  • Make sure you have a valid permit. You can obtain a burning permit at any N.C. Forest Service office or authorized permitting agent, or online.
  • Be sure you are fully prepared before burning. To control the fire, you will need a hose, bucket, steel rake and a shovel for tossing dirt on the fire. Keep a phone nearby, too.
  • Never use kerosene, gasoline, diesel fuel or other flammable liquids to speed debris burning.
  • Stay with your fire until it is completely out.
  • Keep an eye on the weather. Don’t burn on dry, windy days.
  • Don’t pile vegetation on the ground. Instead, place it in a cleared area and contain it in a screened receptacle, away from overhead branches and wires.
  • Household trash should be hauled away to a trash or recycling station. It is illegal to burn anything other than yard debris.
  • These same tips hold true for campfires and barbeques as well. Douse burning charcoal briquettes or campfires thoroughly with water. When soaked, stir the coals and soak them again. Be sure they are out cold and carefully feel to be sure they are extinguished. Never dump hot ashes or coals into a wooded area.
  • Burning agricultural residue and forestland litter: In addition to the rules above, a fire line should be plowed around the area to be burned. Large fields should be separated into small plots for burning one at a time. Before doing any burning in a wooded area, contact your county ranger, who will weigh all factors, explain them and offer technical advice.

Studies have shown that taking these and other measures can reduce the possibility of wildfires. For more information on ways you can prevent wildfires and loss of property, visit the NCFS website

# # #


May 21, 2019

Hooker Falls Access Area Restroom to Open

DuPont State Recreational Forest builds new restrooms for visitors


Photo new restrooms at Hooker Falls in Dupont State Recreational Forest
The new Hooker Falls Access Area restrooms at DuPont State Recreational Forest will be open
for the Memorial Day Weekend. A high-resolution version may be downloaded here

CEDAR MOUNTAIN - DuPont State Recreational Forest (DSRF) is improving visitor service by opening a new restroom near the Hooker Falls Access Area. The facility will be available to the public Thursday, May 23, at 8 a.m. The bathrooms are designed for high-traffic and to improve the visitor experience over portable toilets currently at that location. Funding for the facility was made possible by the support of the Friends of DuPont Forest, the North Carolina Legislature and the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

"We are excited to offer our visitors a new level of comfort and convenience with these restrooms. The facilities are our first new building construction project since 2008, adding to other improvements such as the pedestrian bridge and the Aleen Steinberg Center to keep pace with the public’s needs," said Jason Guidry, DSRF forest supervisor.

Form & Function Architecture, PC in Ashville designed the facility, and the North Carolina branch of Brantley Construction Company, LLC was the general contractor for the project. The facility was sized and designed to provide service to 30,000 visitors in a month. Construction started in late 2017 and had to contend with the record-setting amount of rain throughout 2018.

"We never thought we would be so excited about a bathroom! On any given day, Hooker Falls Access Area is one of the busiest places in the Forest and the bathrooms were a much-needed improvement," said Sara Landry, Friends of DuPont executive director. "We are proud to have partnered with the NC Forest Service to make this happen."

Holly Road Trail and Moore Cemetery Road Trail will reopen to the public after being temporarily closed for the public’s safety during construction.

DuPont State Recreational Forest has nearly 12,000 acres of managed forestland that serves as a popular outdoor recreation destination for over 800,000 visitors a year. The Forest has several iconic waterfalls for scenic enjoyment and more than 80 miles of multiuse trails for hiking, biking and horseback riding. The Forest is managed by the North Carolina Forest Service, a division within the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

# # #


May 16, 2019

Ed Mar Farms inducted to the N.C. Longleaf Honor Roll

CARTHAGE - The N.C. Forest Service joined others from the N.C. Longleaf Coalition to recognize Ed Mar Farms, LLC. for their recent induction to the N.C. Longleaf Honor Roll. This prestigious award was presented to Elise and Tracey McInnis, Chris Marion and Catherine Edwards, owners of Ed Mar Farms, for their efforts managing longleaf pine on their 953-acre farm in Moore County.

To be eligible for the Longleaf Honor Roll, Ed Mar Farms demonstrated active forest management, including regular prescribed burning and minimizing pine straw raking, as well as following other recommendations in their forest management plan. Ed Mar Farms retains consulting forester, David Halley of True North Forest Management Services, and has invested in an updated comprehensive Forest Stewardship Plan that outlines strategies to keep their lands as a working forest that is beautiful and provides benefits to wildlife. A working forest is one that is managed to provide a renewable supply of timber for lumber, paper and other wood products used by people daily.

Altogether, Ed Mar Farms manages 251 acres of longleaf pine. They partnered with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Longleaf Alliance on their most recent longleaf project to carefully select herbicides to remove unwanted vegetation, while preserving the native understory plants. This allowed for the first prescribed burn to take place just one year after planting their longleaf seedlings. Longleaf pines are uniquely situated to survive fire, the most important management tool to create habitat for many species of wildlife including Northern bobwhites, brown-headed nuthatches, deer, fox squirrels and wild turkey.

"Ed Mar Farms are proud stewards of their mature, 60-70-year-old longleaf stand, but their work to return several areas back to longleaf pine is equally commendable. Their extra efforts to retain their older remnant longleaf during the conversion process has created a beautiful, multi-aged stand," said Sarah Crate, Longleaf Coordinator with the N.C. Forest Service and Co-Chair of the N.C. Longleaf Coalition.

In addition to being good stewards of their land, they serve as a model for others by hosting field tours to learn about successful management of longleaf. They are also a certified Tree Farm and enrolled in the Safe Harbor Program. As a certified Tree Farm through the American Tree Farm System they are recognized as being a sustainable forest that helps to protect watershed and healthy wildlife habitats, which includes harvesting trees coupled with reforestation efforts. The Safe Harbor Program was developed to help protect the habitat of the Red-cockaded Woodpecker by addressing conservation needs and the concerns of non-federal property owners in North Carolina.

Ed Mar Farms was presented with an Longleaf Honor Roll sign to display on the property and a 1-year membership into the N.C. Prescribed Fire Council, which fosters cooperation among all parties in the state with an interest in prescribed fire. To learn more about the N.C. Longleaf Coalition visit their website.

If you’re interested in managing your forestland call your county ranger. Contact information can be found here.

# # #


April 5, 2019

N.C. Forest Service urges residents to think safety in spring wildfire season

RALEIGH - The N.C. Forest Service is urging North Carolina residents to think safety and exercise extra caution when burning materials during the spring fire season. The spring fire season typically runs from March through May, and is historically the time when wildfires are most likely to occur.

"The leading cause of wildfires is careless debris burning. Protect our natural resources by acting safely," said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. "Don't burn on dry, windy days; maintain a careful watch over your debris fire; and make sure it is fully extinguished."

Troxler also warned against using drones over wildfires, an emerging concern across the country. In 2018, there were 26 drone incursions into air space over wildfires across the nation. When unauthorized aircraft, such as drones, fly into the same airspace as helicopters and airplanes even at low altitudes, the air operations must be stopped due to safety concerns. This means no water drops to slow the spread of a fire and no eyes in the sky to help direct firefighters on the ground, Troxler said.

The N.C. Forest Service encourages anyone considering debris burning to contact his or her local county forest ranger. The forest ranger can offer technical advice and explain the best options to help maximize safety to people, property and the forest. For people who choose to burn debris, the N.C. Forest Service urges them to adhere to the following tips to protect property and prevent wildfires:

  • Make sure you have an approved burning permit, which can be obtained at any N.C. Forest Service office, a county-approved burning permit agent, or online.
  • Check with your county fire marshal’s office for local laws on burning debris. Some communities allow burning only during specified hours; others forbid it entirely.
  • Check the weather. Don’t burn if conditions are dry or windy.
  • Consider alternatives to burning. Some yard debris such as leaves and grass may be more valuable if composted.
  • Only burn natural vegetation from your property. Burning household trash or any other man-made materials is illegal. Trash should be hauled away to a convenience center.
  • Plan burning for the late afternoon when conditions are typically less windy and more humid.
  • If you must burn, be prepared. Use a shovel or hoe to clear a perimeter down to mineral soil of at least 10-feet, preferably more, around the area around where you plan to burn.
  • Keep fire tools ready. To control the fire, you will need a water hose, bucket, a steel rake and a shovel for tossing dirt on the fire.
  • Never use flammable liquids such as kerosene, gasoline or diesel fuel to speed debris burning.
  • Stay with your fire until it is completely out. Remember, debris burning is the No. 1 cause of wildfires in the state.
  • These same tips hold true for campfires and barbeques as well. Douse burning charcoal briquettes or campfires thoroughly with water. When soaked; stir the coals and soak them again. Be sure they are out cold and carefully feel to be sure they are extinguished. Never dump hot ashes or coals into a wooded area.
  • Burning agriculture residue and forestland litter: In addition to the rules above, a fire line should be plowed around the area to be burned. Large fields should be separated into small plots for burning one at a time. Before doing any burning in a wooded area, contact your county ranger who will weigh all factors, explain them and offer technical advice.

Studies have shown that taking these and other measures can greatly reduce wildfires and the loss of property associated with them. For more information on ways you can prevent wildfires and loss of property, click above on "Programs and Services", click on "Fire Control and Prevention" and follow the links.

# # #


Feburary 1, 2019

Applications being accepted for Florence Reforestation Fund

Requests considered on a first-come, first-served basis


RALEIGH – Woodland owners in 52 counties impacted by Hurricane Florence and recognized as federally-declared disaster areas can now apply for cost-share funding for reforestation efforts. The North Carolina General Assembly approved $2.5 million in time-limited funding for reforestation efforts that will be administered by the N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the N.C. Forest Service.

"Hurricane Florence not only devastated agricultural crops, but the storm also caused considerable damage to our valuable forestlands. The Florence Reforestation Fund will help owners rebuild these natural resources," said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. "I am grateful to legislators for providing funding that will help keep North Carolina green and growing."

Qualifying property in designated counties will be eligible to apply for the program funding. However, funding requests should be for "shovel-ready" projects and practices that can be completed within short time periods. Funds will be administered similar to other NCFS cost‐share programs such as the Timber Restoration Fund that was offered following Hurricane Matthew.

Approved practices include site preparation and tree planting as recommended in the applicant’s management plan. Afforestation of open fields or pastureland is also eligible, however, funding for forest stand improvement practices is not available through this program. To receive reimbursement, at least 4.5 acres of approved, completed work must be documented. The maximum funding allocation will be 100 acres per landowner per fiscal year.

Applications need to be submitted to the landowner’s local N.C. Forest Service office for initial review, before they are sent to the NCFS Central Office for final approval. Applications will be funded on a first‐come, first‐served basis until all available funds have been allocated. Projects should be completed by May 1, 2020.

To learn more about the Florence Reforestation Fund, landowners should call their local county ranger’s office.

# # #

This page updated: Thursday, April 5, 2018 12:01


Back to top